Conversations on Mental Health

 I'm really happy that in recent times the conversation on mental health has opened-up in the media. I think as a society we still have a long way to go, but thankfully things are altering in a positive direction. More people are now willing to engage in these conversations instead of running away from them or uncomfortably clearing their throats and changing the subject (myself included).   I live (and have lived for a long time) with high-functioning generalised anxiety disorder.  That's alot of words that sound kind of serious and scary but it's really just a label for how my brain works. The more I understand about how my mind functions and how to manage it, the better I can live with my high-functioning GAD (generalised anxiety disorder). So in a way, while having a label sounds scary, it also helps me be more healthy than I ever was before I understood what was going on. You can learn more about GAD  here .   I manage my GAD with a combination of exercise, yoga, meditation, therapy and CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy) exercises. It's not always fun, because living with an occasional sense of overwhelming fear and existential dread isn't fun, but mostly I channel it productively. I'm happy to talk about it openly, and I feel I have a responsibility to do so to end the sigma of mental illness. I live a full and productive life and I'm lucky that my GAD has never led to me missing work or important events. What it does mean is that I have a greater responsibility to manage my stress well for my own sake and the sake of those around me. The greatest weapon I have found to tackle my anxiety is to be kind, and not judge myself and to extend this to others. So go be kind ... and get therapy when you need it.    

I'm really happy that in recent times the conversation on mental health has opened-up in the media. I think as a society we still have a long way to go, but thankfully things are altering in a positive direction. More people are now willing to engage in these conversations instead of running away from them or uncomfortably clearing their throats and changing the subject (myself included). 

I live (and have lived for a long time) with high-functioning generalised anxiety disorder.  That's alot of words that sound kind of serious and scary but it's really just a label for how my brain works. The more I understand about how my mind functions and how to manage it, the better I can live with my high-functioning GAD (generalised anxiety disorder). So in a way, while having a label sounds scary, it also helps me be more healthy than I ever was before I understood what was going on. You can learn more about GAD here

I manage my GAD with a combination of exercise, yoga, meditation, therapy and CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy) exercises. It's not always fun, because living with an occasional sense of overwhelming fear and existential dread isn't fun, but mostly I channel it productively. I'm happy to talk about it openly, and I feel I have a responsibility to do so to end the sigma of mental illness. I live a full and productive life and I'm lucky that my GAD has never led to me missing work or important events. What it does mean is that I have a greater responsibility to manage my stress well for my own sake and the sake of those around me. The greatest weapon I have found to tackle my anxiety is to be kind, and not judge myself and to extend this to others. So go be kind ... and get therapy when you need it.